Breastfeeding protects against type 1 diabetes mellitus a case-sibling study

Only about 5 per cent of women have a medical or surgical reason that means they are unlikely to produce enough milk Neifert et al, Perceived low milk supply, as opposed to actual low milk supply, is often cited as the most common reason for cessation of breastfeeding or the early introduction of formula supplements Brown et al, ; Li et al, ; Odom et al, According to a review of 20 years of evidence in the lactation field, perceived low milk supply is the most common reason for weaning, and is bound up with complex cultural, socio-economic and psychological factors Wambach et al, Numerous studies have found that a major reason for a perceived low milk supply is the misinterpretation or lack of preparation regarding normal infant behaviour DaMota et al, ; Wagner et al, ; Palmer et al,

Breastfeeding protects against type 1 diabetes mellitus a case-sibling study

All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files. Abstract Despite our knowledge of the protective role of antibodies passed to infants through breast milk, our understanding of immunity transfer via maternal leukocytes is still limited.

To emulate the immunological interface between the mother and her infant while breast-feeding, we used murine pups fostered after birth onto MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched dams. Overall, data revealed that: It is therefore possible that maternal CTLs found in breast milk are directed to the PPs to compensate for the immature adaptive immune system of the infant in order to protect it against constant oral infectious risks during the postnatal phase.

Introduction The mammalian gastrointestinal tract is strongly conserved. For example, the murine and human gut is composed of organs that are anatomically similar. However, both species have some differences.

Humans have evolved towards a smaller cecum and colon and relatively longer small intestine as compared to the mouse system [ 1 ]. Cells that are essential to intestinal integrity and host-microbiota equilibrium, such as paneth cells, are also conserved between the two species, although there are differences in endogenous components and distribution [ 23 ], as well as timing of crypt formation [ 4 ].

For instance, in mice, crypt formation starts around day 15 after birth, whereas in humans, mature crypt-villus architecture is already defined at birth [ 45 ]. Nevertheless, the gastrointestinal immune system in both species remains immature at birth, since antigenic stimulation of the colonizing microflora is required for its full maturation [ 14 ].

Because little antigen exposure occurs in utero, the adaptive immune system of neonates and infants requires considerable education, and this developmental immaturity creates an immunological state of vulnerability for infections in the postnatal period [ 6 — 8 ].

Mechanisms that facilitate sustained intestinal T cell immaturity during the postnatal period were recently described. Studies found that impaired T cell priming was due to reduced CD28 expression and co-stimulation despite higher TCR and CD3 expressions in these lymphocytes [ 9 ].

Selected Abstracts

On the other hand, maternal soluble S IgA [ 1415 ] and neonatal T regulatory Reg cells [ 1116 ] can act in concert to prevent postnatal T lymphocyte maturation under homeostatic conditions.

In this regard, breast milk-derived soluble IgA might reduce translocation of luminal antigens previously encountered by the dam, thus preventing immune stimulation of infant T lymphocytes by environmental antigens [ 1415 ]. Active immunization through vaccines [ 13 ] and passive immunization through breast milk feeding [ 14 — 18 ] are immunological pathways that promote the maturity and development of the infant immune system.

Indeed, studies investigating neonatal protection against infection during lactation have shown that breast-feeding provides significant protection to growing offspring against diarrhea caused by V. Additionally, epidemiological data have associated breast-feeding with reduced incidence of immune-mediated diseases such as celiac disease, at least in childhood [ 2021 ], and diabetes mellitus type I, but these findings need more research [ 22 ].

Historically, breast milk has been thought to pass immunity to the growing infant only by virtue of its immunoglobulin content [ 23 — 26 ].

Because breast milk antibodies exist in high amounts and are directed against the microbes the mother has met previously, they are poised to protect the growing infant against a wide array of microorganisms [ 2728 ]. More recent studies have shown that breast milk also contains additional components of the maternal immune system [ 29 — 34 ].

Indeed, a variety of maternal leukocytes are present in both colostrum and mature breast milk, with macrophages and neutrophils dominating over lymphocytes [ 34 — 38 ]. However, our understanding of the trafficking of these maternal leukocytes and the significance of their transmission to the suckling offspring is still limited.BACKGROUND: Some epidemiological studies have shown a protective effect of breastfeeding against type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), whereas others have found opposite results.

The role of early. Paronen J, Knip M, Savilahti E, et al. Effect of cow's milk exposure and maternal type 1 diabetes on cellular and humoral immunization to dietary insulin in infants at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

Finnish Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk Study Group. Diabetes. ; – References 1. Alves JG, Figueiroa, JN, Meneses J & Alves, GV () Breastfeeding protects against type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case-sibling study.

Should a mother take diabetes medication while breastfeeding?

Paronen J, Knip M, Savilahti E, et al. Effect of cow's milk exposure and maternal type 1 diabetes on cellular and humoral immunization to dietary insulin in infants at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

Finnish Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk Study Group. Diabetes. ; – The authors concluded that a shorter breastfeeding interval may contribute to type 1 diabetes mellitus.

JG Alves, JN Figueiroa, J Meneses, and GV Alves. Breastfeeding Protects Against Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case-Sibling Study. Breastfeed Med 5 Aug More research on diabetes.

Breastfeeding protects against type 1 diabetes mellitus a case-sibling study

Jun 10,  · Breastfeeding protects against type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case-sibling study. Breastfeeding medicine: the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. .

Breastfeeding after gestational diabetes • Gestational Diabetes UK